6 Ways to Convince Companies of the Benefits of Purchasing a Visitor Management System

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The great battle for public health took place over the last 24 months. It’s almost over. But in the process, it set off a domino effect that repositioned a thousand industries.

While a rare consequence, certain industries actually found new advantages from the new positions they were set to. One such industry, the visitor management system industry, enormously benefited from the pandemic, as the realignment of urban circulation regulations created positive, situation-specific needs within the market.

The pandemic opened eyes to the need for swifter, contactless visitor flow in workplaces. And as further nuances of workplace experience management were explored, the potential for the visitor management industry suddenly expanded.

Features are being added at a mile a minute, and this exciting phase has made marketing much easier. Here are 6 ways you can explain how the newer iterations of the visitor management industry will benefit an end user:

 

1. Discuss how it creates People-first Workplaces through Health Protocols

As health topics rose in importance, visitor management combined with aspects of workplace management to safeguard people against occurrences like contagious, air-borne diseases. Now, the idea of maintaining a workplace that has clean, contactless entry, health screening protocols, and social distancing guidelines is even attractive for the post-pandemic situation.

Putting people first is the motto. If you’re in a debate with a customer and they are unable to recognize the goal of a visitor management system, explain how companies that show corporate social responsibility (CSR) to their employees and visitors build trust in a non-direct way. Providing body temperature scanners, facemask recognition hardware, and more, signals that a company cares for their people. And that makes for a tight-knit, loyal community.

 

2. Explain it as a Data Collection Tool

Visitor management, in its most obvious essence, is the authentication and admission of visitors into one’s premises.

What gets lost in translation is its other, just-as-useful feature: data collection. Collecting personal details offered by visitors at check-in, storing it on a cloud or physical database, adhering to data privacy laws so that data is not misused, and harnessing that data for security, payroll, and compliance issues is often the main function of a visitor management system.

Explain how the data stored can be used to make the overall visitor experience quicker (collected data of repeat visitors allows them quicker entry on their subsequent visits) and the overall visitor management process more seamless for the company doing the managing.

 

3. Show it as a Smartphone-first, Cloud-based Technology

We know that the world runs on cloud-based solutions, from Google Docs to Zoom. And we know that most departments, from marketing to software development, are attuned to a smartphone-first model.

Given that our needs are served mostly on these platforms and devices, then, it stands to reason that, while discussing the necessity of a visitor management solution, we point out how its seamless integration with smartphones of visitors and hosts ensures that it will continue to

We know that the world runs on cloud-based solutions, from Google Docs to Zoom. And we know that most departments, from marketing to software development, are attuned to a smartphone-first model.

Given that our needs are served mostly on these platforms and devices, then, it stands to reason that, while discussing the necessity of a visitor management solution, we point out how its seamless integration with smartphones of visitors and hosts ensures that it will continue to shine in the setting of a dynamic, urban workplace, where people come and go at high frequency. Urban informatics are evolving fast, creating a continuous flow of real-time information between smartphones, and visitor management systems will not be left behind.

The great battle for public health took place over the last 24 months. It’s almost over. But in the process, it set off a domino effect that repositioned a thousand industries. While a rare consequence, certain industries actually found new advantages from the new positions they were set to. One…
The great battle for public health took place over the last 24 months. It’s almost over. But in the process, it set off a domino effect that repositioned a thousand industries. While a rare consequence, certain industries actually found new advantages from the new positions they were set to. One…